Database Cinema and Scholarly Authorship: Rich Media Publishing and Media Visualization with Born Digital Online Video. - New Trends in eHumanities

1. Introduction to Computational Humanities projects, 2. Elizabeth Losh, University of California San Diego

DATE

September 8, 2011

Introduction to Computational Humanities projects:

• Louis Grijp, Meertens Institute: Tunes & Tales – Modelling Oral Transmission

• Rens Bod, UvA: The Riddle of Literary Quality

• Andrea Scharnhorst, DANS/e-Humanities Group: From Fragment to Fabric – Dutch Census Data in a Web of Global Cultural and Historic Information

Between 3-4pm,  participants were invited to work together to present their vision of what the e-Humanities Group will achieve over the next five years.

Elizabeth Losh rom the University of California San Diego (http://losh.ucsd.edu):
Database Cinema and Scholarly Authorship: Rich Media Publishing and Media Visualization with Born Digital Online Video.

Abstract: Far too often the “digital humanities” really refers to “the digitized humanities” that shows how little progress has been made from the discipline’s text encoding roots and how disproportionate the role of print culture continues to be in the field. More attention must be paid to born-digital materials and the central role of media production and curation by non-scholarly users made possible by free or inexpensive tools for recording, editing, compositing, disseminating, and aggregating online video. Elizabeth Losh will highlight how her work with born-digital video materials that range from political pop music remixes commemorating the Arab Spring to U.S., British, and Israeli government video archives for state-sanctioned “Gov 2.0” public relations campaigns reflects a “humanities of the digital” in which the conflicts between regulation andcontent-creation invite new forms of media theorization. She will also discuss how Southern California functions as a hub of innovation in the digital humanities and describe new projects that she has been involved with from both USC’s Institute for Multimedia Literacy and UC San Diego’s Software Studies Initiative.

(Presentation slides)